Testing the glutamate hypothesis of schizophrenia

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A study in this issue presents a new mouse model that directly tests the glutamate hypothesis of schizophrenia. The study reports that a decrease in NMDA receptor signaling during a particular developmental window in interneurons can induce cellular and behavioral changes similar to those seen in schizophrenia.

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Figure 1: Glutamate hypothesis of schizophrenia pathogenesis.

Kim Caesar

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Correspondence to Joshua A Gordon.

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Gordon, J. Testing the glutamate hypothesis of schizophrenia. Nat Neurosci 13, 2–4 (2010) doi:10.1038/nn0110-2

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