Adolescence, brain maturation and mental health

Article metrics

The rate of development of the brain connectome distinguishes adolescents with and without psychiatric symptoms. Those with symptoms exhibit delayed development of connectome distinctiveness as compared to healthy adolescents.

Access options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

Figure 1: The human connectome develops into a clear fingerprint signature by adulthood that is distinct to each person.

Marina Corral Spence / Springer Nature

References

  1. 1

    Lee, F.S. et al. Science 346, 547–549 (2014).

  2. 2

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://nccd.cdc.gov/YouthOnline/App/Default.aspx (2015).

  3. 3

    World Health Organization (WHO). Economic Aspects of Mental Health in Children and Adolescents (WHO, Geneva, 2007).

  4. 4

    Etkin, A. Lancet Psychiatry 3, 12–13 (2016).

  5. 5

    Galván, A. Neuron 83, 262–265 (2014).

  6. 6

    Finn, E.S. et al. Nat. Neurosci. 18, 1664–1671 (2015).

  7. 7

    Kaufmann, T. et al. Nat. Neurosci. 20, 513–515 (2017).

  8. 8

    Sherman, L.E. et al. Dev. Cogn. Neurosci. 10, 148–159 (2014).

  9. 9

    Piekarski, D.J. et al. Brain Res. 1654 Pt B, 123–144 (2017).

  10. 10

    Stevens, M.C. Neurosci. Biobehav. Rev. 70, 13–32 (2016).

Download references

Author information

Correspondence to Adriana Galván.

Ethics declarations

Competing interests

The author declares no competing financial interests.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Galván, A. Adolescence, brain maturation and mental health. Nat Neurosci 20, 503–504 (2017) doi:10.1038/nn.4530

Download citation

Further reading