Supplementary Figure 6: REM sleep strengthens persistent new spines during development and after motor training. | Nature Neuroscience

Supplementary Figure 6: REM sleep strengthens persistent new spines during development and after motor training.

From: REM sleep selectively prunes and maintains new synapses in development and learning

Supplementary Figure 6

(a) Distribution of size change of persistent new spines in non-deprived control, NREM-d and REMD P21 mice over 8-16 h (32 new spines from 7 mice for ND, 24 spines from 5 mice for NREM-d and 55 spines from 7 mice for REMD). (b) Repeated imaging of dendritic spines before and 24 hours after rotarod training (forward) in non-deprived control and REMD P30 mice. Arrowheads indicate new spines formed during 0-8 h after training and persisted over the next 16 hours. (c) Distribution of size change of persistent new spines induced by FW training in non-deprived control, NREM-d and REMD P30 mice over 8-16 h (22 new spines from 6 mice for ND, 37 new spines from 7 mice for NREM-d and 37 new spines from 6 mice for REMD). (d) Distribution of size change of persistent new spines induced by FW training in non-deprived control, NREM-d and REMD P30 mice over 8-24 h (54 new spines from 16 mice for ND, 31 new spines from 7 mice for NREM-d and 75 new spines from 16 mice for REMD). (e) Distribution of size change of persistent new spines induced by BW training in non-deprived control, NREM-d and REMD P30 mice over 8-16 h (23 new spines from 6 mice for ND, 23 new spines from 6 mice for NREM-d and 57 new spines from 6 mice for REMD). *P < 0.05, **P < 0.01, ***P < 0.001, Wilcoxon–Mann–Whitney test.

Back to article page