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Crash course in pallidus–habenula signaling

Nature Neuroscience volume 19, pages 981983 (2016) | Download Citation

During cocaine withdrawal, a shift in the balance between excitatory and inhibitory inputs from globus pallidus to lateral habenula may activate habenula and contribute to the aversive 'crash' state.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Masago Ishikawa and Paul J. Kenny are in the Department of Neuroscience, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA.

    • Masago Ishikawa
    •  & Paul J Kenny

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Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Paul J Kenny.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nn.4349

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