Facing up to stereotypes

Our understanding of faces reflects both our perception of their facial features and our social knowledge. This interaction of stereotypes and vision can be observed in brain signals in fusiform gyrus and orbitofrontal cortex.

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Figure 1: Mapping stereotype responses to brain activity.

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Correspondence to Martin N Hebart or Chris I Baker.

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The authors declare no competing financial interests.

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Hebart, M., Baker, C. Facing up to stereotypes. Nat Neurosci 19, 763–764 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1038/nn.4309

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