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Gamma-range synchronization of fast-spiking interneurons can enhance detection of tactile stimuli

Nature Neuroscience volume 17, pages 13711379 (2014) | Download Citation

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Abstract

We tested the sensory impact of repeated synchronization of fast-spiking interneurons (FS), an activity pattern thought to underlie neocortical gamma oscillations. We optogenetically drove 'FS-gamma' while mice detected naturalistic vibrissal stimuli and found enhanced detection of less salient stimuli and impaired detection of more salient ones. Prior studies have predicted that the benefit of FS-gamma is generated when sensory neocortical excitation arrives in a specific temporal window 20–25 ms after FS synchronization. To systematically test this prediction, we aligned periodic tactile and optogenetic stimulation. We found that the detection of less salient stimuli was improved only when peripheral drive led to the arrival of excitation 20–25 ms after synchronization and that other temporal alignments either had no effects or impaired detection. These results provide causal evidence that FS-gamma can enhance processing of less salient stimuli, those that benefit from the allocation of attention.

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Acknowledgements

We thank R. Clary, J. Feather, H. Farrow, R. Lichtin, S. Bechek, J. Klee, N. Padilla and C. Burley for help running experiments, J. Cardin, U. Knoblich, M. Halassa, J. Ritt, J. Voigts, C. Deister, B. Higashikuibo, D. Meletis and M. Carlén, and members of the Moore laboratory, M. Wilson, M. Andermann, R. Haslinger, N. Kopell, C. Börgers, R. Sekuler and D. Sheinberg for their comments on the manuscript. This study was supported by a grant from the US National Institutes of Health to C.I.M., a National Research Service Award Fellowship to D.L.P., and a National Defense and Science & Engineering Graduate Fellowship and a National Research Service Award Fellowship to J.H.S.

Author information

Author notes

    • Dominique L Pritchett

    Present address: Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown, Lisbon, Portugal.

    • Joshua H Siegle
    •  & Dominique L Pritchett

    These authors contributed equally to this work.

Affiliations

  1. Department of Neuroscience and Institute for Brain Science, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA.

    • Joshua H Siegle
    • , Dominique L Pritchett
    •  & Christopher I Moore
  2. Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.

    • Joshua H Siegle
    •  & Dominique L Pritchett

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Contributions

J.H.S., D.L.P. and C.I.M. designed the experiments. J.H.S. designed the implants and performed the viral injections. D.L.P. and J.H.S. designed the behavioral rig and oversaw training. J.H.S. and D.L.P. analyzed the data. J.H.S., D.L.P. and C.I.M. made the figures and wrote the manuscript.

Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Christopher I Moore.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nn.3797

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