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Nature Neuroscience volume 16, pages 658659 (2013) | Download Citation

A study shows that circadian glucocorticoid oscillations have dual roles in dendritic spine plasticity, controlling spine formation and elimination through distinct mechanisms important for motor learning.

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Affiliations

  1. Mitra Heshmati and Scott J. Russo are in the Fishberg Department of Neuroscience and Friedman Brain Institute, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA.

    • Mitra Heshmati
    •  & Scott J Russo

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Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Scott J Russo.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nn.3400

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