Article | Published:

Grid cells in pre- and parasubiculum

Nature Neuroscience volume 13, pages 987994 (2010) | Download Citation

Abstract

Allocentric space is mapped by a widespread brain circuit of functionally specialized cell types located in interconnected subregions of the hippocampal-parahippocampal cortices. Little is known about the neural architectures required to express this variety of firing patterns. In rats, we found that one of the cell types, the grid cell, was abundant not only in medial entorhinal cortex (MEC), where it was first reported, but also in pre- and parasubiculum. The proportion of grid cells in pre- and parasubiculum was comparable to deep layers of MEC. The symmetry of the grid pattern and its relationship to the theta rhythm were weaker, especially in presubiculum. Pre- and parasubicular grid cells intermingled with head-direction cells and border cells, as in deep MEC layers. The characterization of a common pool of space-responsive cells in architecturally diverse subdivisions of parahippocampal cortex constrains the range of mechanisms that might give rise to their unique functional discharge phenotypes.

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Acknowledgements

We thank R. Skjerpeng for programming, D. Derdikman for help with code, J. Ainge for donating an implanted rat, and A.M. Amundgård, I. Hammer, K. Haugen, K. Jenssen and H. Waade for technical assistance. This work was supported by the Kavli Foundation and a Centre of Excellence grant from the Norwegian Research Council.

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience and Centre for the Biology of Memory, MTFS, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.

    • Charlotte N Boccara
    • , Francesca Sargolini
    • , Veslemøy Hult Thoresen
    • , Trygve Solstad
    • , Menno P Witter
    • , Edvard I Moser
    •  & May-Britt Moser
  2. Laboratoire de Neurobiologie de la Cognition – CNRS, UMR 6155 – Pôle 3C, Université de Provence, Marseille, France.

    • Francesca Sargolini

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Contributions

C.N.B., F.S., M.P.W., E.I.M. and M.-B.M. planned and interpreted the study. M.-B.M. provided training and supervision. C.N.B., F.S. and T.S. performed surgeries. C.N.B. and M.P.W. performed histological reconstructions. C.N.B., F.S., V.H.T. and T.S. recorded the data. C.N.B., F.S., E.I.M. and M.-B.M. carried out the analyses. C.N.B. and E.I.M. wrote the paper. Data from a previous study16 were reanalyzed by C.N.B. and E.I.M.

Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Edvard I Moser.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nn.2602

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