Immune evasion: Face changing in the fungal opera

Growth of Candida albicans on different host carbon sources reveals that the cell wall is a live organelle that can respond to alterations in the environment by masking a cell surface epitope to protect the fungal cell from the host immune response.

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Figure 1: Modifications of fungal cell wall organization induced by changes in the environment.

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Correspondence to Jean-Paul Latgé.

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Latgé, JP. Immune evasion: Face changing in the fungal opera. Nat Microbiol 2, 16266 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1038/nmicrobiol.2016.266

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