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Microbial ecology: Seeing growth without culture

Nature Microbiology volume 1, Article number: 16158 (2016) | Download Citation

Protein-synthesizing bacterial and archaeal cells can now be visualized by an adaptation of the BONCAT method, and sorted from complex samples for sequencing. A demonstration on the uncultivated, slow-growing methane-oxidizing consortia shows the high potential of this new method.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Antje Boetius is at the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany.

    • Antje Boetius

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Correspondence to Antje Boetius.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nmicrobiol.2016.158

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