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Perturbing interactions

A new version of the reverse two-hybrid strategy is now available that uses mammalian cells and the reconstitution of the JAK/STAT pathway. This should broaden substantially the possibilities of identifying reagents that specifically dissociate protein-protein interactions.

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Figure 1: Bacterial, yeast and mammalian forward and reverse two-hybrid systems differ in the cellular context in which two-hybrid interactions take place.