Super-resolution imaging goes fast and deep

Advances in image scanning microscopy move super-resolution imaging deeper into tissues with faster visualization and finer details.

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Figure 1: (a) Fluorescence detected by detector pixels not on the optical axis originate from sample areas that are similarly not on the optical axis.

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Correspondence to Peter Dedecker.

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Duwé, S., Dedecker, P. Super-resolution imaging goes fast and deep. Nat Methods 14, 1042–1044 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1038/nmeth.4484

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