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Large-scale de novo DNA synthesis: technologies and applications

Nature Methods volume 11, pages 499507 (2014) | Download Citation

Abstract

For over 60 years, the synthetic production of new DNA sequences has helped researchers understand and engineer biology. Here we summarize methods and caveats for the de novo synthesis of DNA, with particular emphasis on recent technologies that allow for large-scale and low-cost production. In addition, we discuss emerging applications enabled by large-scale de novo DNA constructs, as well as the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead.

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Affiliations

  1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA.

    • Sriram Kosuri
  2. Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

    • George M Church
  3. Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

    • George M Church

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  1. Search for Sriram Kosuri in:

  2. Search for George M Church in:

Competing interests

S.K. and G.M.C. own stock in and are on the Scientific Advisory Board of Gen9, a company that sells synthetic genes. G.M.C. is on the Board of Directors of Sigma-Aldrich and the Scientific Advisory Board of Cambrian Genomics, both companies that sell synthetic genes or oligos.

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Correspondence to Sriram Kosuri.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nmeth.2918