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Molecular junctions

Single-molecule contacts exposed

Nature Materials volume 14, pages 465466 (2015) | Download Citation

Using a scanning tunnelling microscopy-based method it is now possible to get an atomistic-level description of the most probable binding and contact configuration for single-molecule electrical junctions.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Richard J. Nichols and Simon J. Higgins are in the Department of Chemistry, University of Liverpool, Crown Street, Liverpool L69 7ZD, UK

    • Richard J. Nichols
    •  & Simon J. Higgins

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Corresponding author

Correspondence to Richard J. Nichols.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nmat4225

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