News & Views | Published:

Bioengineering and regenerative medicine

Keeping track

Nature Materials volume 12, pages 180181 (2013) | Download Citation

Assessing when cell death occurs following in vivo transplantation of stem cells is challenging. Now, pH-sensitive hydrogel capsules containing arginine-based liposomes are shown to act as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents, allowing cell death to be monitored within the capsules.

Access optionsAccess options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

References

  1. 1.

    et al. Nature Mater. 12, 268–275 (2013).

  2. 2.

    , & Nature Rev. Clin. Oncol. 8, 677–688 (2011).

  3. 3.

    et al. Nature Clin. Pract. Oncol. 6, 53–58 (2009).

  4. 4.

    , & Nanotechnology 16, R9–R25 (2005).

  5. 5.

    AJR Am. J. Roentgenol. 193, 314–325 (2009).

  6. 6.

    et al. J. Nucl. Med. 48, 1708–1714 (2007).

  7. 7.

    , & J. Magn. Reson. 143, 79–87 (2000).

  8. 8.

    & Magn. Reson. Med. 65, 927–948 (2011).

  9. 9.

    & Annu. Rev. Biomed. Eng. 10, 391–411 (2008).

  10. 10.

    , , , & Nature Med. 9, 1085–1090 (2003).

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA

    • Keren Ziv
    •  & Sanjiv S. Gambhir
  2. Department of Bioengineering, Materials Science and Engineering, Bio-X, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA

    • Sanjiv S. Gambhir

Authors

  1. Search for Keren Ziv in:

  2. Search for Sanjiv S. Gambhir in:

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Sanjiv S. Gambhir.

About this article

Publication history

Published

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nmat3579

Newsletter Get the most important science stories of the day, free in your inbox. Sign up for Nature Briefing