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Cell rheology

Mush rather than machine

Nature Materials volume 12, pages 184185 (2013) | Download Citation

The cytoplasm of living cells responds to deformation in much the same way as a water-filled sponge does. This behaviour, although intuitive, is connected to long-standing and unsolved fundamental questions in cell mechanics.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA

    • Enhua H. Zhou
    •  & Jeffrey J. Fredberg
  2. University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85724, USA

    • Fernando D. Martinez

Authors

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Corresponding author

Correspondence to Jeffrey J. Fredberg.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nmat3574

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