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Poisson's ratio and modern materials

Nature Materials volume 10, pages 823837 (2011) | Download Citation

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Abstract

In comparing a material's resistance to distort under mechanical load rather than to alter in volume, Poisson's ratio offers the fundamental metric by which to compare the performance of any material when strained elastically. The numerical limits are set by ½ and −1, between which all stable isotropic materials are found. With new experiments, computational methods and routes to materials synthesis, we assess what Poisson's ratio means in the contemporary understanding of the mechanical characteristics of modern materials. Central to these recent advances, we emphasize the significance of relationships outside the elastic limit between Poisson's ratio and densification, connectivity, ductility and the toughness of solids; and their association with the dynamic properties of the liquids from which they were condensed and into which they melt.

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  • 24 October 2011

    In the print version of this Review, in Box 2, 'an order of magnitude' should read 'orders of magnitude' in the sixth sentence from the end. In the caption for Fig. 1, the credit given for part a actually related to part b. In Fig. 5c, the arrow labels for the inner and outer core are transposed. In the Acknowledgements, C. Kurkjian is spelt incorrectly. The online versions are correct.

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Acknowledgements

We acknowledge support from the Higher Education Funding Coucil for Wales, the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (UK), the Natural Environment Research Council (UK), the National Science Foundation (USA), and the Ministry of Research and Higher Education in France. We are also indebted to J. Grima, T. Kelly, C. Kurkjian, J. Orava, R. Reis and R. Walton for discussions in the preparation of this Review.

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Affiliations

  1. Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ, UK

    • G. N. Greaves
    •  & A. L. Greer
  2. Institute of Mathematics and Physics, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth SY23 3BZ, UK

    • G. N. Greaves
  3. Department of Engineering Physics, Department of Materials Science, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Wisconsin 53706-1687, USA

    • R. S. Lakes
  4. Applied Mechanics Laboratory, LARMAUR ERL-CNRS 6274, Université Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes cedex, France

    • T. Rouxel

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Correspondence to G. N. Greaves.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nmat3134

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