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A 3.6 V lithium-based fluorosulphate insertion positive electrode for lithium-ion batteries

Nature Materials volume 9, pages 6874 (2010) | Download Citation

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Abstract

Li-ion batteries have contributed to the commercial success of portable electronics, and are now in a position to influence higher-volume applications such as plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. Most commercial Li-ion batteries use positive electrodes based on lithium cobalt oxides. Despite showing a lower voltage than cobalt-based systems (3.45 V versus 4 V) and a lower energy density, LiFePO4 has emerged as a promising contender owing to the cost sensitivity of higher-volume markets. LiFePO4 also shows intrinsically low ionic and electronic transport, necessitating nanosizing and/or carbon coating. Clearly, there is a need for inexpensive materials with higher energy densities. Although this could in principle be achieved by introducing fluorine and by replacing phosphate groups with more electron-withdrawing sulphate groups, this avenue has remained unexplored. Herein, we synthesize and show promising electrode performance for LiFeSO4F. This material shows a slightly higher voltage (3.6 V versus Li) than LiFePO4 and suppresses the need for nanosizing or carbon coating while sharing the same cost advantage. This work not only provides a positive-electrode contender to rival LiFePO4, but also suggests that broad classes of fluoro-oxyanion materials could be discovered.

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Acknowledgements

We would like to thank M. Courty for having carried out some of the TGA measurements, D. W. Murphy and P. Barpanda and members of ALISTORE-ERI for technical discussions, F. Wudl’s group at UCSB for their kindness in hosting the visits of J.-M.T. and W.W. and sharing their laboratory synthesis facilities as well as the materials research laboratory for using their XRD equipment.

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Affiliations

  1. LRCS -UMR 6007- Université de Picardie Jules Verne, 80039 Amiens, France

    • N. Recham
    • , J-N. Chotard
    • , L. Dupont
    • , C. Delacourt
    • , W. Walker
    • , M. Armand
    •  & J-M. Tarascon
  2. Materials Department, University of California Santa Barbara, California 93106, USA

    • W. Walker
    •  & J-M. Tarascon

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The authors declare no competing financial interests.

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Correspondence to W. Walker or J-M. Tarascon.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nmat2590

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