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Zeolite A imidazolate frameworks

Nature Materials volume 6, pages 501506 (2007) | Download Citation

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Abstract

Faujasite (FAU) and zeolite A (LTA) are technologically important porous zeolites (aluminosilicates) because of their extensive use in petroleum cracking and water softening1,2. Introducing organic units and transition metals into the backbone of these types of zeolite allows us to expand their pore structures, enhance their functionality and access new applications3,4. The invention of metal–organic frameworks and zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) has provided materials based on simple zeolite structures where only one type of cage is present5,6,7,8,9. However, so far, no metal–organic analogues based on FAU or LTA topologies exist owing to the difficulty imposed by the presence of two types of large cage (super- and β-cages for FAU, α- and β-cages for LTA). Here, we have identified a strategy to produce an LTA imidazolate framework in which both the link geometry and link–link interactions play a decisive structure-directing role. We describe the synthesis and crystal structures of three porous ZIFs that are expanded analogues of zeolite A; their cage walls are functionalized, and their metal ions can be changed without changing the underlying LTA topology. Hydrogen, methane, carbon dioxide and argon gas adsorption isotherms are reported and the selectivity of this material for carbon dioxide over methane is demonstrated.

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Acknowledgements

This work was supported by BASF Ludwigshafen, Germany, US Department of Energy (DEFG0206ER15813) and Japan Society for Promotion of Science (Postdoctoral Fellowship, H.H.).

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Affiliations

  1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Center for Reticular Chemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, 607 Charles E. Young Drive East, Los Angeles, California 90095-1569, USA

    • Hideki Hayashi
    • , Adrien P. Côté
    • , Hiroyasu Furukawa
    •  & Omar M. Yaghi
  2. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604, USA

    • Michael O’Keeffe

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The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding authors

Correspondence to Hideki Hayashi or Omar M. Yaghi.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nmat1927

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