News & Views | Published:

Quantum dots

Artificial atoms for quantum optics

Nature Materials volume 5, pages 855856 (2006) | Download Citation

Subjects

Colloidal quantum dots are efficient nanoscopic light emitters with interesting applications from optoelectronics to biomedical imaging. Their polarizability has now been measured directly by probing the electronic response without electrical contacts.

Access optionsAccess options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

References

  1. 1.

    & Nature Mater. 5, 683–696 (2006).

  2. 2.

    et al. Nature Mater. 5, 861–864 (2006).

  3. 3.

    et al. Nature 414, 286–289 (2001).

  4. 4.

    & in Encyclopedia of Modern Optics (eds Guenther, R. D., Steel, D. G. & Bayvel, L.) 168–175 (Elsevier, Oxford, 2004).

  5. 5.

    et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 057408 (2006).

  6. 6.

    et al. Science 278, 2114–2117 (1997).

  7. 7.

    & Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 097402 (2003).

  8. 8.

    et al. Nano Lett. 6, 557–561 (2006).

  9. 9.

    et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 017402 (2005).

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Rudolf Bratschitsch and Alfred Leitenstorfer are in the Department of Physics and the Center for Applied Photonics at the University of Konstanz, PO Box M695, D-78457 Konstanz, Germany.  Rudolf.Bratschitsch@uni-konstanz.de;  Alfred.Leitenstorfer@uni-konstanz.de

    • Rudolf Bratschitsch
    •  & Alfred Leitenstorfer

Authors

  1. Search for Rudolf Bratschitsch in:

  2. Search for Alfred Leitenstorfer in:

About this article

Publication history

Published

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nmat1768

Further reading

Newsletter Get the most important science stories of the day, free in your inbox. Sign up for Nature Briefing