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Computational methods

A search engine for catalysts

Nature Materials volume 5, pages 847848 (2006) | Download Citation

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Trial and error has been the traditional method of finding the best catalyst for a reaction. A computational approach can reduce the lab work required.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Manos Mavrikakis is in the Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA. manos@engr.wisc.edu

    • Manos Mavrikakis

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nmat1767

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