Feeling pain? Who's your daddy...

A new modulator of pain comes to light in studies of rats and people (pages 1269–1277).

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Figure 1: Role of BH4 in modulating pain systems.

Kim Caesar

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Pasternak, G., Inturrisi, C. Feeling pain? Who's your daddy.... Nat Med 12, 1243–1244 (2006). https://doi.org/10.1038/nm1106-1243

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