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Life on the inside for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

Nature Medicine volume 9, pages 13561357 (2003) | Download Citation

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M. tuberculosis persists in the body, sequestered inside macrophages and subverting the phagocytic machinery to create a membrane-bound home. Microarray profiling studies reveal how the bacterium settles into its new environment.

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Affiliations

  1. John D. McKinney and James E. Gomez are in the Laboratory of Infection Biology, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, New York 10021, USA. mckinney@rockefeller.edu or gomezj@rockefeller.edu

    • John D McKinney
    •  & James E Gomez

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nm1103-1356

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