Review Article | Published:

Stabilization of atherosclerotic plaques: New mechanisms and clinical targets

Nature Medicine volume 8, pages 12571262 (2002) | Download Citation

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  • An Erratum to this article was published on 01 January 2003

Research points to pivotal roles for lipids in the development of atherosclerotic plaques. Lipid-lowering statins substantially reduce acute coronary events resulting from plaque development, but only modestly reduce arterial stenosis. This apparent paradox has shifted the goal of therapy towards plaque stabilization rather than enlargement of the lumen. More thorough understanding of the biology of atherosclerosis should enable us to manipulate plaque stability, and reduce further the acute complications of atherosclerosis.

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Acknowledgements

We thank K.E. Williams and D. Lynn for their editorial assistance. The work from our laboratory described herein was supported by grants to P.L. from the Leducq Foundation and the United States National Institutes of Health, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

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  1. Leducq Center for Cardiovascular Research, Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

    • Peter Libby
    •  & Masanori Aikawa

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Correspondence to Peter Libby.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nm1102-1257

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