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Platelets in atherothrombosis

Nature Medicine volume 8, pages 12271234 (2002) | Download Citation

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The participation of platelets in atherogenesis and the subsequent formation of occlusive thrombi depend on platelets' adhesive properties and the inability to respond to stimuli with rapid activation. By understanding the multifaceted mechanisms involved in platelet interactions with vascular surfaces and aggregation, new approaches can be tailored to selectively inhibit the pathways most relevant to the pathological aspects of atherothrombosis.

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Acknowledgements

The author is supported by grants from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.

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  1. Department of Molecular and Experimental Medicine The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California, USA ruggeri@scripps.edu

    • Zaverio M. Ruggeri

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nm1102-1227

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