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Innate and acquired immunity in atherogenesis

Nature Medicine volume 8, pages 12181226 (2002) | Download Citation

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Traditional risk factors like hypercholesterolemia are important for atherogenesis, but it is now apparent that the immune system also plays an important role. Uncovering the mechanisms by which specific components of the immune system impact atherogenesis will not only provide new insights into the pathogenesis of lesion formation, but could also lead to novel therapeutic approaches that involve immune modulation.

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  1. Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA

    • Christoph J. Binder
    • , Mi-Kyung Chang
    • , Peter X. Shaw
    • , Yury I. Miller
    • , Karsten Hartvigsen
    • , Asheesh Dewan
    •  & Joseph L. Witztum

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nm1102-1218

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