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Converting p53 from a killer into a healer

Nature Medicine volume 8, pages 11961198 (2002) | Download Citation

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Selenium-containing compounds are in phase 2 and 3 clinical trials for prostate cancer prevention, although it is unclear how they work. A study suggests that selenium can facilitate DNA repair by activating the p53 tumor suppressor in an unusual way.

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Affiliations

  1. Department of Molecular Biology Lerner Research Institute Cleveland Clinic Foundation Cleveland, Ohio, USA gudkov@ccf.org

    • Andrei V. Gudkov

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nm1102-1196

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