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Turning a new phage

Nature Medicine volume 18, pages 13181320 (2012) | Download Citation

The idea of using bacteria-fighting viruses as a weapon against hard-to-treat infections is making a surprising comeback, but with a twist on how it has been attempted for nearly a century. Researchers and companies are now tweaking and deconstructing these bacteria killers in an effort to develop a new arsenal against antibiotic-resistant superbugs—one with more potency and a better likelihood of regulatory approval. Lauren Gravitz reports.

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  1. Lauren Gravitz is a science writer based in Los Angeles, California.

    • Lauren Gravitz

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nm0912-1318

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