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A skeleton key to metabolism

Nature Medicine volume 13, pages 10211023 (2007) | Download Citation

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The bone-specific protein osteocalcin has now been shown to act as a hormone that profoundly affects glucose and fat metabolism. This discovery completes an endocrine circuit with the skeleton as a ductless gland.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. T. John Martin is in St. Vincent's Institute and the Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, 9 Princes Street, Fitzroy 3065, Victoria, Australia. jmartin@svi.edu.au

    • T John Martin

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Competing interests

The author declares no competing financial interests.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nm0907-1021

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