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M. tuberculosis passes the litmus test

Nature Medicine volume 14, pages 809810 (2008) | Download Citation

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One of the body's key defenders against infection—the activated macrophage—engulfs bacteria and destroys them with an acid cocktail inside lysosomes. Mycobacterium tuberculosis seems to have evolved a strategy to cope with this threat (pages 849–854).

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Affiliations

  1. John D. MacMicking is in the Section of Microbial Pathogenesis, Boyer Center for Molecular Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, 295 Congress Avenue, New Haven, Connecticut 06510, USA.  john.macmicking@yale.edu

    • John D MacMicking

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nm0808-809

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