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T-cell homeostasis in HIV infection is neither failing nor blind: Modified cell counts reflect an adaptive response of the host

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Grossman, Z., Herberman, R. T-cell homeostasis in HIV infection is neither failing nor blind: Modified cell counts reflect an adaptive response of the host. Nat Med 3, 486–490 (1997). https://doi.org/10.1038/nm0597-486

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