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Putting sleeping sickness to bed

Nature Medicine volume 17, pages 1417 (2011) | Download Citation

For most people, a single bite from a parasite-infected tsetse fly can trigger a slow, agonizing and sometimes fatal disease known as African sleeping sickness. But new research shows that some people, as well as baboons and other great apes, are naturally resistant to infection. Cassandra Willyard awakens to the possibility of using existing immunity to engineer new therapies and transgenic livestock.

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Affiliations

  1. Cassandra Willyard is a science writer based in Brooklyn, New York

    • Cassandra Willyard

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nm0111-14

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