Inflammation and cancer: the long reach of Ras

For decades cancer biologists have thought of oncogenes in terms of their ability to prompt tumor growth and survival, acting within the cancer cell. That viewpoint is now changing to take into account data showing that oncogenes influence inflammation. Insights now emerge from work on Ras and the proinflammatory mediator interleukin-8, produced by tumor-infiltrating immune cells.

Access options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

Figure 1: Ras reaches out.

Ann Thomson

Figure 2: Beyond the grave.

Ann Thomson

References

  1. 1

    Coussens, L.M. & Werb, Z. Nature 420, 860–867 (2002).

  2. 2

    Balkwill, F. & Mantovani, A. Lancet 357, 539–545 (2001).

  3. 3

    Reedy, J. Clio Medica 10, 227–238 (1975).

  4. 4

    Dvorak, H.F. N. Engl. J. Med. 315, 1650–1659 (1986).

  5. 5

    Sparmann, A. & Bar-Sagi, D. Cancer Cell 6, 447–458 (2004).

  6. 6

    Karin, M. J. Biol. Chem. 270, 16483–16486 (1995).

  7. 7

    Matsusaka, T. et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 90, 10193–10197 (1993).

  8. 8

    Yasumoto, K. et al., J. Biol. Chem. 267, 22506–22511 (1992).

  9. 9

    Matsushima, K. et al., J. Exp. Med. 167, 1883–1893 (1988).

  10. 10

    Becker, C. et al. Immunity 21, 491–501 (2004).

  11. 11

    Greten, F.R. et al. Cell 118 285–296 (2004).

Download references

Author information

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Karin, M. Inflammation and cancer: the long reach of Ras. Nat Med 11, 20–21 (2005). https://doi.org/10.1038/nm0105-20

Download citation

Further reading