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Increasing the neurological-disease toolbox using iPSC-derived microglia

Nature Medicine volume 22, pages 12061207 (2016) | Download Citation

A new study presents a protocol to differentiate human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) into microglia that closely resemble their in vivo counterparts. These cells offer an exciting new tool for learning more about the role of microglia in disease.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Timothy R. Hammond and Beth Stevens are in the Department of Neurology, F.M. Kirby Neurobiology Center, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

    • Timothy R Hammond
    •  & Beth Stevens

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Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Beth Stevens.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nm.4226

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