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Patient iPSCs: a new discovery tool for Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome

Nature Medicine volume 22, pages 343344 (2016) | Download Citation

A new study with patient stem cell–based modeling of Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) shows that the accumulation of a specific cholesterol precursor dysregulates the Wnt/b-catenin pathway, which in turn leads to precocious neural differentiation.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Zhexing Wen, Hongjun Song and Guo-li Ming are in the Institute for Cell Engineering and the Department of Neurology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

    • Zhexing Wen
    • , Hongjun Song
    •  & Guo-li Ming

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Corresponding author

Correspondence to Hongjun Song.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nm.4081

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