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Germs and joints: the contribution of the human microbiome to rheumatoid arthritis

Nature Medicine volume 21, pages 839841 (2015) | Download Citation

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a debilitating autoimmune disorder, the etiology of which is poorly understood. A new study reveals dysbiosis in gut and oral microbiomes of affected individuals, potentially providing a basis for patient stratification and clues to pathophysiological mechanisms of RA onset and progression.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Geraint B. Rogers is in the Infection & Immunity Theme of the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, and is based at the School of Medicine, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia.

    • Geraint B Rogers

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Competing interests

The author declares no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Geraint B Rogers.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nm.3916

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