Article

Cholesterol efflux in megakaryocyte progenitors suppresses platelet production and thrombocytosis

  • Nature Medicine volume 19, pages 586594 (2013)
  • doi:10.1038/nm.3150
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Abstract

Platelets have a key role in atherogenesis and its complications. Both hypercholesterolemia and increased platelet production promote atherothrombosis; however, a potential link between altered cholesterol homeostasis and platelet production has not been explored. Here we show that transplantation of bone marrow deficient in ABCG4, a transporter of unknown function, into Ldlr−/− mice resulted in thrombocytosis, accelerated thrombosis and atherosclerosis. Although not detected in atherosclerotic lesions, Abcg4 was highly expressed in bone marrow megakaryocyte progenitors (MkPs). Abcg4−/− MkPs had defective cholesterol efflux to high-density lipoprotein (HDL), increased cell surface expression of the thrombopoietin (TPO) receptor (c-MPL) and enhanced proliferation. These consequences of ABCG4 deficiency seemed to reflect disruption of negative feedback regulation of c-MPL signaling by the E3 ligase c-CBL and the cholesterol-sensing LYN kinase. HDL infusion reduced platelet counts in Ldlr−/− mice and in a mouse model of myeloproliferative neoplasm in an ABCG4-dependent fashion. HDL infusions may offer a new approach to reducing atherothrombotic events associated with increased platelet production.

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Acknowledgements

A.J.M. was supported by a postdoctoral fellowship from the American Heart Association (12POST11890019). This study was supported by US National Institutes of Health grant HL107653 (A.R.T.). We thank A.L. DeFranco and C.A. Lowell of the University of California, San Francisco for providing Lyn−/− bone marrow cells and W. Tong of the University of Pennsylvania for providing the antibody to c-MPL for flow cytometry analysis.

Author information

Author notes

    • Andrew J Murphy
    •  & Nora Bijl

    These authors contributed equally to this work.

    • Alan R Tall
    •  & Nan Wang

    These authors jointly directed this work.

Affiliations

  1. Department of Medicine, Division of Molecular Medicine, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA.

    • Andrew J Murphy
    • , Nora Bijl
    • , Laurent Yvan-Charvet
    • , Carrie B Welch
    • , Alan R Tall
    •  & Nan Wang
  2. Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program and Leukemia Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA.

    • Neha Bhagwat
    •  & Ross L Levine
  3. Canadian Blood Services and the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

    • Adili Reheman
    • , Yiming Wang
    •  & Heyu Ni
  4. Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Alfred Hospital/Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

    • James A Shaw

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Contributions

A.J.M., N. Bijl and N.W. conceived the study, designed, performed and analyzed the experiments and wrote the manuscript. L.Y.-C., C.B.W., N. Bhagwat, A.R., Y.W. and J.A.S. designed, performed and analyzed experiments. R.L.L. and H.N. provided intellectual input and assisted with the preparation of the manuscript. A.R.T. conceived the study and contributed to writing the manuscript.

Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Nan Wang.

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