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Thinking inside the box: how T cell inhibitory receptors signal

Nature Medicine volume 18, pages 13381339 (2012) | Download Citation

T cells responding to tumor cells and chronic viral pathogens are ineffective because their function is suppressed by inhibitory receptors such as Tim-3. New work identifies the first component of the Tim-3 inhibitory signaling pathway in T cells (pages 1394–1400).

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. W. Nicholas Haining is in the Department of Pediatric Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, and at the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

    • W Nicholas Haining

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The author declares no competing financial interests.

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Correspondence to W Nicholas Haining.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nm.2921

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