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Diagnosis in a dish: your skin can help your brain

Nature Medicine volume 17, pages 15581559 (2011) | Download Citation

The discovery that skin cells from an adult human can be reprogrammed back to their embryonic stage and then differentiated to produce neuron-like cells in culture opens an opportunity to study disease pathogenesis and screen potential therapeutic drugs. A new study provides an example of this approach for the neuropsychiatric disorder Timothy syndrome (pages 1657–1662).

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Anita Huttner and Pasko Rakic are at the Department of Neurobiology and Kavli Institute for Neuroscience, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.

    • Anita Huttner
    •  & Pasko Rakic
  2. Anita Huttner is also at the Department of Pathology at Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.

    • Anita Huttner

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Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Pasko Rakic.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nm.2599

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