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Glioma-related seizures: glutamate is the key

Nature Medicine volume 17, pages 11901191 (2011) | Download Citation

Epilepsy complicates the clinical course of many patients with brain tumors, particularly gliomas. A mouse model of glioma now indicates that glioma cells release glutamate, causing tumor-related seizures (pages 1269–1274). Sulfasalazine, an approved therapeutic for Crohn's disease, can block glutamate release and improve seizures in these mice; therefore, this drug may also have potential antiepileptic effects in humans.

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Affiliations

  1. Matthias Simon and Marec von Lehe are at Neurochirurgische Universitätsklinik, Bonn, Germany.

    • Matthias Simon
    •  & Marec von Lehe

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The authors declare no competing financial interests.

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Correspondence to Matthias Simon or Marec von Lehe.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nm.2510

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