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Chaperone-assisted protein folding: the path to discovery from a personal perspective

Nature Medicine volume 17, pages 12061210 (2011) | Download Citation

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Acknowledgements

I had the privilege to work with many young scientists who deserve my deeply felt gratitude. I apologize to those whose contributions could not be discussed here. I am especially grateful to Manajit, my wife and colleague, who has contributed tremendously to our work and who shares my excitement for science. I thank my mentors and advisors for continued support and guidance, especially W. Neupert, as well as W. Just, H. Schimassek, W. Wickner and J. Rothman. I would also like to thank all our colleagues in New York City, especially those at Memorial Sloan-Kettering, for welcoming us so warmly into their community and making our years in the Big Apple such a fantastic experience. Finally, I would like to thank the chaperone research community for more than 20 years of collegial support and for the many friendships that have evolved. I acknowledge generous research support from the Max Planck Society, the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, the European Union, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the US National Institutes of Health and the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.

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  1. F. Ulrich Hartl is at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Martinsried, Germany.

    • F Ulrich Hartl

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The author declares no competing financial interests.

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Correspondence to F Ulrich Hartl.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nm.2467

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