Skip to main content

Thank you for visiting nature.com. You are using a browser version with limited support for CSS. To obtain the best experience, we recommend you use a more up to date browser (or turn off compatibility mode in Internet Explorer). In the meantime, to ensure continued support, we are displaying the site without styles and JavaScript.

  • News & Views
  • Published:

The social aspects of EMT-MET plasticity

Although the importance of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is acknowledged in tumor metastasis, the contribution of the reverse process—MET—to cancer progression has been unclear. A new study shows that the miR-200 family regulates MET and metastatic colonization in breast cancer, suggesting that flexible transitions between EMT and MET, or epithelial-mesenchymal plasticity, may be crucial at different stages of metastasis (pages 1101–1108).

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution

Relevant articles

Open Access articles citing this article.

Access options

Buy this article

Prices may be subject to local taxes which are calculated during checkout

Figure 1: Potential roles of EMP in carcinoma progression supported by current literature and Korpal et al.7.

Katie Vicari

References

  1. Hanahan, D. & Weinberg, R.A. Cell 144, 646–674 (2011).

    Article  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  2. Al-Hajj, M., Wicha, M.S., Benito-Hernandez, A., Morrison, S.J. & Clarke, M.F. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 100, 3983–3988 (2003).

    Article  CAS  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  3. Blick, T. et al. J. Mammary Gland Biol. Neoplasia 15, 235–252 (2010).

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  4. Mani, S.A. et al. Cell 133, 704–715 (2008).

    Article  CAS  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  5. Gregory, P.A. et al. Nat. Cell Biol. 10, 593–601 (2008).

    Article  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  6. Kaplan, R.N. et al. Nature 438, 820–827 (2005).

    Article  CAS  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  7. Korpal, M., et al. Nat. Med. 17, 1101–1108 (2011).

    Article  CAS  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  8. Warzecha, C.C. et al. Embo J. 29, 3286–3300 (2010).

    Article  CAS  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  9. Chaffer, C.L. et al. Cancer Res. 66, 11271–11278 (2006).

    Article  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  10. Chao, Y.L., Shepard, C.R. & Wells, A. Mol. Cancer 9, 179 (2010).

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  11. Yates, C.C., Shepard, C.R., Stolz, D.B. & Wells, A. Br. J. Cancer 96, 1246–1252 (2007).

    Article  CAS  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  12. Dykxhoorn, D.M. et al. PLoS ONE 4, e7181 (2009).

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  13. Lelekakis, M. et al. Clin. Exp. Metastasis 17, 163–170 (1999).

    Article  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  14. Yang, J. et al. Cell 117, 927–939 (2004).

    Article  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  15. Scheel, C. et al. Cell 145, 926–940 (2011).

    Article  CAS  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to I Haviv.

Ethics declarations

Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Thompson, E., Haviv, I. The social aspects of EMT-MET plasticity. Nat Med 17, 1048–1049 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1038/nm.2437

Download citation

  • Published:

  • Issue Date:

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/nm.2437

Search

Quick links

Nature Briefing: Cancer

Sign up for the Nature Briefing: Cancer newsletter — what matters in cancer research, free to your inbox weekly.

Get what matters in cancer research, free to your inbox weekly. Sign up for Nature Briefing: Cancer