Review Article | Published:

The cancer stem cell: premises, promises and challenges

Nature Medicine volume 17, pages 313319 (2011) | Download Citation

Abstract

Over the last decade, the notion that tumors are maintained by their own stem cells, the so-called cancer stem cells, has created great excitement in the research community. This review attempts to summarize the underlying concepts of this notion, to distinguish hard facts from beliefs and to define the future challenges of the field.

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Acknowledgements

The author thanks E. Verheyen for discussions.

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Affiliations

  1. Hubrecht Institute, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences and University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

    • Hans Clevers

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The author declares no competing financial interests.

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Correspondence to Hans Clevers.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nm.2304

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