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Distinct lineages of TH1 cells have differential capacities for memory cell generation in vivo

Nature Immunology volume 3, pages 852858 (2002) | Download Citation

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Abstract

We studied here the long-term maintenance of distinct populations of T helper type 1 (TH1)-lineage cells in vivo and found that effector TH1 cells, defined by their secretion of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), are short-lived and do not efficiently develop into long-term memory TH1 cells. In contrast, a population of activated TH1-lineage cells that did not secrete IFN-γ after primary antigenic stimulation persisted for several months in vivo and developed the capacity to secrete IFN-γ upon subsequent stimulation. These data suggest that a linear differentiation pathway, as defined by the transition from IFN-γ–producing to resting memory cells, is relatively limited in vivo and support a revised model for TH1 memory differentiation.

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Acknowledgements

We thank B. Marshal for editorial assistance and X. Tai for technical help with cell preparation.

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Affiliations

  1. Cellular Immunology Section, Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892-3005, USA.

    • Chang-you Wu
    • , Joanna R. Kirman
    • , Masashi J. Rotte
    • , Dylan F. Davey
    • , Elizabeth G. Rhee
    • , Brenda L. Freidag
    •  & Robert A. Seder
  2. Human Immunology Section, Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892-3005, USA.

    • Steve P. Perfetto
  3. Immunotechnology Section, Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892-3005, USA.

    • Brenna J. Hill
    •  & Daniel C. Douek

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The authors declare no competing financial interests.

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Correspondence to Robert A. Seder.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ni832

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