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A neuronal receptor, neuropilin-1, is essential for the initiation of the primary immune response

Nature Immunology volume 3, pages 477482 (2002) | Download Citation

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  • A Corrigendum to this article was published on 01 April 2003

Abstract

The initiation of a primary immune response requires contact between dendritic cells (DCs) and resting T cells. However, little is known about the proteins that mediate this initial contact. We show here that neuropilin-1, a receptor involved in axon guidance, was expressed by human DCs and resting T cells both in vitro and in vivo. The initial contact between DCs and resting T cells led to neuropilin-1 polarization on T cells. DCs and resting T cells specifically bound soluble neuropilin-1, and resting T cells formed clusters with neuropilin-1–transfected COS-7 cells in a neuropilin-1–dependent manner. Functionally, preincubation of DCs or resting T cells with blocking neuropilin-1 antibodies inhibited DC-induced proliferation of resting T cells. These data suggest that neuropilin-1 mediates interactions between DCs and T cells that are essential for initiation of the primary immune response and show parallels between the nervous and immune systems.

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Acknowledgements

We thank M. Tessier-Lavigne and Z. He for the gift of the NP-1 construct and of anti–neuropilin-1 (intracytoplasmic and blocking anti–neuropilin-1); A. Amara for the gift of anti-DC-SIGN; A. Trautmann, G. Bismuth and A. Chédotal for their advice; and A. Baruchel for his advice and encouragement. Supported by the INSERM, the CNRS and the Association pour la Recherche sur le Cancer(grant number 5715). M. C. was supported by the Fondation pour la Recherche Médicale.

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Affiliations

  1. Institut Cochin, Departement d'Hematologie, INSERM U567, CNRS UMR 8104, Paris, France.

    • Rafaèle Tordjman
    • , Valérie Lemarchandel
    • , Marie Cambot
    •  & Paul-Henri Roméo
  2. CNRS UMR 8603 and Service d'Hematologie, Hôpital Necker, Paris, France.

    • Yves Lepelletier
    •  & Olivier Hermine
  3. Département de Pathologie EA 2348, Hôpital Henri Mondor, Créteil, France.

    • Philippe Gaulard

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The authors declare no competing financial interests.

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Correspondence to Rafaèle Tordjman or Olivier Hermine.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ni789