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Origin of dendritic cells in peripheral lymphoid organs of mice

Nature Immunology volume 8, pages 578583 (2007) | Download Citation

Abstract

Parabiosis experiments demonstrating that dendritic cells (DCs) do not equilibrate between mice even after prolonged joining by parabiosis have suggested that DCs are derived from self-renewing progenitors that divide in situ. However, here we found that unequal exchange of DCs between mice joined by parabiosis reflected uneven distribution of DC precursors in blood due to their short half-life in circulation. DCs underwent only a limited number of divisions in the spleen or lymph nodes over a 10- to 14-day period and were replenished from blood-borne precursors at a rate of nearly 4,300 cells per hour. Daughter DCs presented antigens captured by their progenitors, suggesting that DC division in peripheral lymphoid organs can prolong the duration of antigen presentation in vivo.

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Acknowledgements

We thank R. Steinman, K. Tarbell and E. Besmer for reading the manuscript. Supported by the National Institutes of Health (M.N. and J.H.), the Verto Institute (J.H.) and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (M.N.).

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Laboratory of Molecular Immunology, The Rockefeller University, New York, New York 10021, USA.

    • Kang Liu
    • , Claudia Waskow
    • , Kaihui Yao
    •  & Michel Nussenzweig
  2. Department of Applied Mathematics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA.

    • Xiangtao Liu
  3. Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA.

    • Josephine Hoh
  4. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10021, USA.

    • Michel Nussenzweig

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Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Michel Nussenzweig.

Supplementary information

PDF files

  1. 1.

    Supplementary Fig. 1

    Not all blood leukocytes are equally exchanged in the parabiotic system despite shared circulation.

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    Supplementary Fig. 2

    Dividing DCs in lymph nodes.

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    Supplementary Fig. 3

    Blood T cell clearance and exchange in parabiotic mice.

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    Supplementary Methods

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ni1462

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