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Signaling protein SWAP-70 is required for efficient B cell homing to lymphoid organs

Nature Immunology volume 7, pages 827834 (2006) | Download Citation

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Abstract

The migration of B cells into secondary lymphoid organs is required for the generation of an effective immune response. Here we analyzed the involvement of SWAP-70, a Rac-interacting protein involved in actin rearrangement, in B cell entry into lymph nodes. We noted reduced migration of Swap70−/− B cells into lymph nodes in vivo. Swap70−/− B cells rolled and adhered, yet accumulated in lymph node high endothelial venules. This defect was not due to impaired integrin expression or chemotaxis. Instead, Swap70−/− B cells aberrantly regulated integrin-mediated adhesion. During attachment, Swap70−/− B cells showed defective polarization and did not form uropods or stabilize lamellipodia at a defined region. Thus, SWAP-70 selectively regulates processes essential for B cell entry into lymph nodes.

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Acknowledgements

We thank L. Quemeneur for discussions, and A. Berg and M. Chopin for help. Supported by the National Institutes of Health (AI49470 to R.J.) and the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (SFB605 to R.J.).

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Dresden University of Technology, 01307 Dresden, Germany.

    • Glen Pearce
    •  & Rolf Jessberger
  2. Department of Gene and Cell Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York 10029, USA.

    • Veronique Angeli
    • , Gwendalyn J Randolph
    •  & Rolf Jessberger
  3. Center for Blood Research, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

    • Tobias Junt
    •  & Ulrich von Andrian
  4. Institute of Physiology, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden 01307, Germany.

    • Hans-Joachim Schnittler

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The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Rolf Jessberger.

Supplementary information

PDF files

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    Supplementary Fig. 1

    Inflammation-induced migration of B cells into the peritoneum.

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    Supplementary Fig. 2

    Flow cytometric analysis of integrin and chemokine receptor expression on purified B cells.

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    Supplementary Fig. 3

    Actin polymerization and Rac-1 activity and localization.

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    Supplementary Methods

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    Supplementary Note

Videos

  1. 1.

    Supplementary Video 1

    WT B cells moving on an anti-CD44 coated surface. Images were collected every 10 sec for 20 min after a 25 min attachment period.

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    Supplementary Video 2

    Swap70−/− B cells moving on an anti-CD44 coated surface. Images were collected every 10 sec for 20 min after a 25 min attachment period.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ni1365

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