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More things in heaven and earth: defining innate and adaptive immunity

Nature Immunology volume 11, pages 10801082 (2010) | Download Citation

Natural killer cells have emerged as key components of innate immunity with critical antimicrobial functions. New work showing that they can also be accessed by vaccination to deliver antigen-specific memory responses and protect against subsequent viral infections challenges the traditional distinctions made between innate and adaptive immunity.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Christine A. Biron is in the Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA.

    • Christine A Biron

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Competing interests

The author declares no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Christine A Biron.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ni1210-1080

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