Class switching and Myc translocation: how does DNA break?

Chromosomal translocations involving immunoglobulin switch regions are commonly thought to arise from aberrant AID-induced DNA lesions. New data, however, suggest AID does not initiate such lesions, but acts subsequently in the B cell transformation process.

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Figure 1: Generation of DSBs in S regions.

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Casali, P., Zan, H. Class switching and Myc translocation: how does DNA break?. Nat Immunol 5, 1101–1103 (2004). https://doi.org/10.1038/ni1104-1101

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