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Ligand-independent redistribution of Fas (CD95) into lipid rafts mediates clonotypic T cell death

Nature Immunology volume 5, pages 182189 (2004) | Download Citation

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Abstract

Clonotypic elimination of activated T cells through Fas–Fas ligand (CD95–CD95L) interactions is one mechanism of peripheral self-tolerance. T cell receptor (TCR) stimuli trigger FasL synthesis but also sensitize activated T cells to Fas-mediated apoptosis through an unknown mechanism. Here we show that TCR restimulation of activated human CD4+ T cells resulted in Fas translocation into lipid raft microdomains before binding FasL, rendering these cells sensitive to apoptosis after stimulation with bivalent antibody or FasL. Disruption of lipid rafts reduced sensitivity to Fas-mediated apoptosis after TCR restimulation. Thus, the redistribution of Fas and other tumor necrosis factor family receptors into and out of lipid rafts may dynamically regulate the efficiency and outcomes of signaling by these receptors.

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Acknowledgements

We thank M. Lenardo, S. Pierce, J. Rivera and P. Schwartzberg for critically reviewing the manuscript; L. Zheng, F. Hornung and I. Stefanova for discussions; and A. Cherukuri for technical assistance. J.R.M. is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute–National Institutes of Health Research Scholar and is supported by grant 5-T32-ES007079 from the US National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (National Institutes of Health).

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Affiliations

  1. Immunoregulation Unit, Autoimmunity Branch, National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.

    • Jagan R Muppidi
    •  & Richard M Siegel
  2. Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas 66160, USA.

    • Jagan R Muppidi
  3. Howard Hughes Medical Institute–National Institutes of Health Research Scholars Program, Bethesda 20892, Maryland, USA.

    • Jagan R Muppidi

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The authors declare no competing financial interests.

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Correspondence to Richard M Siegel.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ni1024

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